Conservation

Our objective is to conserve and enhance England’s natural environment – including the landscape, biodiversity, geology and soils, natural resources, cultural heritage and other features of the built and natural environment.

Many areas of England are protected in National Parks, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and other designated areas, and the condition of our very best wildlife sites is slowly improving. However, many of our landscapes are continuing to lose their ecological richness and their distinctive character.

The natural environment is a provider of a wide range of environmental services, including clean water and air, healthy food, recreation and inspiration. However, in many areas the natural environment is in poor condition, reducing the quality of these environmental services.

Ensuring that future generations can enjoy England’s rich geology, landscapes and biodiversity means that we must significantly improve the protection and management of what we have today. Improving the condition of the natural environment is required to ensure that everyone benefits from the services it provides.
Coronation Street goes batty (April 2008)
Information on bats to coincide with a story line in this popular television series.

Better Than Natural Garden Benches – The New Winawood

Updated 17th February 2017: Now some of you may prefer the classic wooden bench in your home, but if you didn’t already know, there are a few different options out there when choosing your next set of garden furniture.

A Winawood bench review taken from Garden Centre Shopping

There is a new compacted polymer material called Winawood now out, that looks and feels like real wood, but is actually completely man made. It even has a grain effect to it, which completely transforms the way you start to think about man made furniture, as it actually looks really natural!

One of the best things about this new garden bench range, is that it’s weatherproof, which means it won’t require any teak oil or other furniture covers when left outside over winter, a big time saver if you take into account how much time and money this would actually take to maintain a 2 or 3 seater wooden bench, which can take hours of your time every 3 months, requiring you to sand it down, rub oil into it, and cover or even store it in the winter.

Sarah Phillips

Gardener at Self Employed
Horticulture expert and professional gardener based in the Midlands, England.

Latest posts by Sarah Phillips (see all)

    1 thought on “Conservation”

    Comments are closed.